Selling a Family Business Isn’t Business as Usual

selling family businessFamily businesses may resemble their non-family counterparts in most ways, but there’s one crucial difference. Whenever close relatives work together, deep emotions invariably become involved – emotions that can further complicate the already difficult decision whether to sell a family enterprise.

If you’re thinking about selling a family business, don’t overlook what your emotions are telling you about the potential sale. In some instances, of course, you’re better off listening to your head. But in this case, it’s just as important to consider what your heart is telling you too.

Why You Might Sell

Your decision to sell a family business may start with financial need. Maybe you’re looking ahead to retirement and want to feel more secure. Or maybe you see stiff challenges ahead for your company, with fewer growth prospects available or increased competition looming.

You might also look to sell a family business if you’re concerned that no one in the next generation has stepped up as an obvious management successor.

In addition, the stress of working together can be too much for some families to handle comfortably. Family strife is always unpleasant, but when family members who work together don’t get along and the tensions spill into the workplace, it can make for a destructive personal and professional environment.

Why You Might Not

Selling a family business can feel like selling a part of your family. If you sell, your decision will have a significant impact on the lives of people you care about – relatives, employees, and, especially if the business is in a close-knit community, local residents.

Your decision to sell may be especially stressful if you’re thinking of selling a business handed down to you over many years. You may wonder about what your forebears would do in your shoes.

With such factors to consider, you may decide to refuse an otherwise attractive offer and keep your business going – a decision that will allow you to maintain your independence, and pass on to future generations the same opportunities that you received.

Yet before you turn down an attractive offer, make sure you discuss your expectations with the members of the next generation. If your chosen successors aren’t interested or able to manage the business, you may be setting the stage for serious family conflict.

No Easy Answers

Sometimes, selling your business may be the best solution for everyone involved, providing you and your family with the assets you need to pursue your next dreams.

But because the decision to sell can be highly emotional, make sure you are comfortable with the idea of selling. Just because the numbers may add up doesn’t mean you’ll be happy when you no longer have the business that has been an important part of your family

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The VR Transaction Process: 20 Steps To A Successful Sale – Part 1

With over 30 years of experience in selling small to medium enterprises (SME), VR has developed a dynamic and effective Transaction Process to promote a win/win outcome for both Buyer and Seller.  Over the next two blog entries, we shall be sharing with you the 20 Step VR Process to Selling your business.  Here are the first 10 Steps to a successful sale:

1.     Initial Meeting:

The initial meeting serves as an introduction to VR and explanation on how VR can help maximize the value of your business and answer any questions. During this meeting your VR Intermediary will ask to review your business tax returns, company financials, brochures and sales materials, and any other pertinent information to understand your company.

Read the full article here.

What Buyers Look For In A Business Opportunity

You have built a great business with love and care. It has grown larger than you’d
ever imagined, and generates a nice profit that has allowed you and your family to live
comfortably. Now you’re ready to sell. You assume there’s a buyer out there who will
pay you a fair price and then nurture the company with the same attention you have. What’s more, selling the business is a major part of your retirement plan.

Needless to say, buyers look at businesses differently than sellers. So to achieve the
outcome you want, it’s important to think like buyers and understand how they evaluate a business.

What buyers look for

There are many types of buyers: strategic and financial, individuals, companies, and
private equity funds. Despite differences, all buyers consider how much they’ll invest
to acquire a business, the amount of risk they’ll bear and the potential return on their
investment. To evaluate an opportunity, buyers focus on three major areas:

1. Cost and terms.

What will it take to acquire the business? How much cash and how much debt?
What are the deal’s terms and conditions?

2. Continuity

Will the business continue to operate similarly after the sale? Much of the risk of
buying a company relates to continuity. For example:

_ The current owner has personal relationships with customers, distributors or vendors that the new owners may have to struggle to maintain,

_ The owner has special expertise that is undocumented and difficult to learn,

_ Key personnel aren’t committed to staying, or

_ Offshore competition looms.

Sellers armed with solid responses to these types of continuity concerns are more likely to get their desired price. Even if you don’t want to sell your business for a few years, take steps now to ensure it can run smoothly without your personal involvement.

That independence could be worth millions when you sell.

3. Growth

Are there unexploited opportunities? You may have focused your sales efforts in
one geographic region, but there may be many opportunities to take the
product national or international. A buyer that believes it can increase revenues
substantially will pay more for the business than one that believes the current
owners have already maximized opportunities.

What sellers should do?

It may seem counterintuitive, but the things you may be most proud of can work against getting the best price for your company. Not many entrepreneurs like to boast that their company could run just fine without them or that there are plenty of opportunities they’ve failed to exploit. Yet these may be the very factors buyers seek, along with lower cash requirements. Please call us for help in understanding how to best present your company for sale.

JoAnn Lombardi | How to Approach Selling Your Business

How to Approach Selling Your Business

Article by JoAnn Lombardi, Pres. VR Business Sales

When a business owner makes the decision to sell, the goal of selling a business remains the same, maximizing what you receive from the sale.

When the decision is made to sell the business, there are some pointers to follow in making sure the transaction is successful.

Standing by the Process

Deciding the Point Person for the Sale

Establishing Deadlines

Communicate with Your Landlord and Banker

Readying for Buyer Due Diligence

Determining what should be Included in Letter of Intent

For more details read full article here How to Approach Selling Your Business

 

JoAnn Lombardi | Being Aware of Deal Breakers in a Business Sale

Being Aware of Deal Breakers in a Business Sale

Article By JoAnn Lombardi, President VR Business Sales
When the time is approaching when the business sale is near, both buyers and sellers can jump the gun, resulting in complications.

At VR, we advise you on paying attention to every step of the process.

There are a few factors that can cause a deal to collapse, which you should know:

Undisclosed Information Surfaces

Asking for Additional/No Collateral

Lack of Buyer and Seller Rapport

Inability by Buyer to Raise Necessary Capital

The Seller Backs Out

For more details read full article here  Being Aware of Deal Breakers in a Business Sale

 

To learn more about avoiding these and other types of deal breakers, contact your local VR business intermediary today.

 

 

 

JoAnn Lombardi – Deciding to Position Your Business for Sale

Deciding to Position Your Business for Sale

By JoAnn Lombardi, Pres. VR Business Brokers
When a business owner decides that the time is right to sell the business, regardless of the reason (burnout, retirement, new aspirations), it is imperative to do so the right way so the optimal sales price can be obtained.

As a business owner, it is easy to have concerns when contemplating whether to sell your business; especially when you start to see that the process of selling your business doesn’t give that flexibility that you need to make the best deal.

It’s important to start planning early on toward the time when you decide to sell your business.

You want to look at building long-term value, not only making a profit in the short term.

Read full article here  Deciding to Position Your Business for Sale

 

Contact VR at 1.800.377.8722 for assistance toward planning to sell your business.

 

JoAnn Lombardi – Restriction Clauses When Selling A Business

When to Apply Restrictions and Prohibitions in the Business Deal

By JoAnn Lombardi, President VR Business Brokers

It’s important for both Buyer and Seller to protect themselves by including the proper terms and conditions in the Business Sale Agreement.

The fact is the buyer is going to have concerns about the seller possibly taking away the goodwill that they’ve created.

The seller will want to know what activities that they will be able to engage in without the threat of legal action.

There are also important factors to understand and cover in the agreement such as “Competition” versus “Solicitation”

Other important points include Express Provisions in the Sales Contract  and Course of Action.

Read the full article here  When to Apply Restrictions and Prohibitions in the Business Deal